Music Is Alive And Well In The Villages

of=50,480,360A good friend of ours shared some information about the musical activities in a well-known area known as The Villages, “Florida’s Friendliest Hometown”.

The Villages is located in central Florida mid-way between the Gulf and Atlantic coasts. It’s an hour north of Orlando near Interstate 75 and the Florida Turnpike, close to Florida’s famous tourist attractions and Orlando’s International Airport.

This popular city is far from what most would consider a retirement village as you will see from just the musical activities available there. Our new friend Corky has supplied us with a few of their instrumental activities and I wanted to share them with you to let you know that there are areas in our fine country which are not only offering fine music but also promoting fine music.

The Bands Of The Village (BOTV) consist of seven instrumental performing groups made up of Villages residents for the benefit of all Villagers. There are no membership dues or fees for the bands and musicians need only to provide their own instrument and music stand.

The Villages Band program offers the following ensembles-

The Villages Concert Band

The New Horizons Concert Band

The Villages Hometown Band

The BOTV Ensembles (one of which is their Trumpet Choir pictured above)

The Villages “Sunshine Strollers”

The Villages Swing Band

The Jazz Workshop

Does this sound appealing to you? It does to me.

To those in the Villages, I salute you for what you have done and are continuing to do for the advancement and propagation of fine music. To you all, “Thank you and watch for me to be down there to check you out in the near future”.

You sound like “my kind of people”.

Speaking Of Christmas!

ccc 007Our sister site (trumpetensemblemusic.com) has added many new Christmas trumpet arrangements. You still have time to work them up before your big Christmas concert. We have improved our site to make it easier and quicker to download your PDF music files (about two minutes).

Here are just a few of this year’s additions-

Gesu Bamnino- Brass Quartet (Trumpet 1-2, Trombone 1-2)

God Bless Ye Merry Gentlemen- Trumpet Trio

Free Trumpet Sheet Music- Caroling, Caroling / Brass Quartet (Tpts.1-2, Tbns. 1-2)

O Holy Night- Brass Quartet (Trumpets 1, 2 Trombones 1, 2) w/ Organ

We Three Kings Part #2- Brass Quintet

Feliz Navidad- Trumpet Quartet

Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas- Solo Track

What Child Is This (Greensleeves)? Trumpet trio with optional Piano

O Holy Night- Trumpet Solo/Duet/Trio/Quartet/ w Organ


Christmas Suite #1 – Trumpet Duet

Christmas Suite #2 – Trumpet Duet

We Need A Little Christmas- Trumpet Quartet

santa-baby-trumpet-quartet-woptional-bass

All I Want For Christmas Are Teeth- Trumpet Trio

Jingle Bells- Brass Quintet

We Three Kings Part #1- Brass Quintet

Little Drummer Boy- Solo Track

Do You Hear What I Hear? – Trumpet Quintet

Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas- Trumpet Quartet

The Christmas Song- Trumpet Trio

Mary Did You Know? Brass Quartet Trumpet 1-2 and Trombone 1-2

Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree- Trumpet Trio w/opt.Bass

Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)- Trumpet Trio w/opt. Bass

Jingle Bells- Trumpet solo or duet with MP3 accompaniment

O Come, O Come, Emmanuel- Trumpet Solo / Duet or Trio w/Organ

Winter Wonderland- Solo Track

Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow- Trumpet Quartet

Jingle Bell Rock Fantasy- Trumpet Quartet

Carol of the Bells- Trumpet Choir

Auld Lang Syne- Sometimes refered to as “Old Hank’s Sign”- Trumpet Octet

……just to list a few.

“Trumpets In Concert” – Have A Very Mellow Christmas

trumpet ensemble 002

Christmas is just around the corner and to put you all in a very mellow mood, I wanted to share with you a very musical trumpet ensemble called “Trumpets In Concert”

Gernot Kahofer, Manuel Lichtenwöhrer, Leonhard Leeb – Trumpets
Bernhard Macheiner – Keyboards, Organ
Thomas Mair – Percussion

Read more about this musical ensemble on their Web site at…..

Trumpets In Concert

This arrangement of “Blue Christmas” is available at our sister site trumpetensemblemusic.com

The Trumpet Players Ultimate Problem Solving Check List

ChecklistDisclaimer: There ain’t no such thing, but this is as close to one as you will find.

This is a product born by need and a very sleepless night. It is my intent to list the most common problems facing trumpet players today and I will offer a few suggestions as to how these problems may be solved or at least improved. For one person to profess to have the knowledge to solve every problem a trumpet player may face would be an example of simple stupidity. Even though I have run into many problems myself as well as observed common problems of my students. No one person could be so gifted and for that reason I will say that this material is offered only as a guide to the most common problems and their solutions.

It is my intent to create this source and as our readers base increases, so will the material offered. If you have any problem (trumpet related material only) which is not on this list, leave a comment as to your problem and we will add it to our list. Also, if you have an additional solution to any of the problems list, include your solution as a comment and we will add it to our post also.

Remember: This “Ultimate Problem Solving Check List” will only succeed through your contribution to this project.

Listed below are the most common problems trumpet players are dealing with today.

Breathing
1
2
3
4
5

Correct Mouthpiece Placement
1

Dizziness
1
2
3

Endurance
1
2

Flexibility
1
2
3

High Range
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Improve Musicality
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Improvise
1
2
3

Intonation
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Lip Trills
1

Low Range
1

Motivation To Practice
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Mouthpiece Pressure
1
2
3
4

Nervousness
1
2

Playing Loudly
1

Playing Softly
1

Shakes
1

Sight Reading
1

Stiff Chops
1
2
3

Stuck Slide
1

Tone
1

Tonguing
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Transposition
1
2

Tuning/ Intonation
1
2

Valve Problems
1

Vibrato
1

Warm-ups
1
2

Wet Or Dry Embouchure
1

Playing a Musical Is Like Going Every Day To The Office

thMost playing jobs for musicians seem different than regular day jobs non musicians enjoy. Regular jobs require some sort of ridged schedule at the same location. The dress code usually is standardized and the pay checks come at a predetermined time and usually in the same amount. Commercial musicians on the other hand work under different conditions. Commercial musicians might be playing in different locations, receiving differing amounts of payment and dress as the leader suggests. Material covered on a playing job will vary according to the interests of the audience and the hours will be determined by either the mother of the bride or the liquor laws at the club. Musicians playing for musicals tend to be a different lot for their work schedule and surroundings tend to be more like an office worker and to illustrate this, I will review my current life style as a musician performing in the pit for a musical.

We are currently performing a new musical in Branson titled “Wartime Romance” which came to Branson last week.

The conditions for a musician in this setting is remarkably contrasting to the usual shows performed here. Most shows have a featured entertainer who has charts specially written for him/her and supporting entertainers with their own charts. Most shows require constant playing unless the supporting entertainer happened to be a comedian or magician. The compensation for your work is usually given at the end of the week. If you are playing in a combo or big band for a party or dances, the three to four hours are filled with standard after standard tunes, only interrupted by a break every hour or two. Payment is usually given at the end of the evening and preferably in cash. Contrary to many peoples thinking, the “cash only joke” stems from the frequency of bad checks not just a way to cheat on your income tax. Performing a concert will require many hours of rehearsals ending in a final concert and payment is determined by the performance or series of performances by the ensemble. Playing a musical on the other hand is different in many ways.

Musicians performing a musical go to the same location, wear the same uniform and play, in most cases, the same music in the same manner for each performance. Very little opportunity is given to improvisation as in the case of the jazz combo. Dress code is usually black on black on black. Payment is many times once a week and your working area is very confined. This is also similar to working at a desk and everything you require to do your work is within easy reach.

For those not familiar with a musician’s typical day at the office, let me give you my routine at this time.

I get to the theater about one-half hour before curtain in order to set out mutes, place my thermos of coffee, and make sure my music is in order. This is also the time the musical director will inform every one of any changes in the show. Waiting to begin is when the musician’s trade stories of bad jobs of the past and get up to date on fellow musicians. Shortly before curtain, you wait in silence for the cue for the opening overture. After the downbeat, each musician functions as an independent desk worker completing his/her work until a break in the action on stage. Sometimes these breaks will last only seconds and they sometime can last for several minutes at which time you have a coffee break or sit silently thinking of what you need to do at home after work. Each entrance and the following series of notes should be the same as it was in rehearsal. Just sit there and do your work as best you can. In long running shows, the repetition of the job can get to you and at that point fellow musicians feel obligated to pull pranks on unsuspecting members of the ensemble, dutifully keeping the humor from the conductor and most especially from the paying audience.

During the lunch break (intermission), everyone hangs out at the water cooler (green room) and then it’s back to work again and thus flows the day at the office for a pit musician.